Media

Dwight Evans seeks second term in Congress

April 27th, 2018 | The Philadelphia Tribune

By Michael D’Onofrio

Incumbent Dwight Evans said he will rely on a his political record and experience as a longtime politician against a political newcomer in the upcoming Democratic primary.

“Who is most effective and who will get things done?” Evans asked during a recent Philadelphia Tribune editorial board meeting. “I provide the kind of leadership that is necessary to address the issues.”

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McClinton wants gun violence declared a public health crisis

April 25th, 2018 | The Philadelphia Tribune

By Stacy Brown

During a series of hearings on gun violence before the House Judiciary Committee, state Rep. Joanna McClinton (D-191), highlighted what she called the disparity in coverage of gun violence between low-income communities of color and more affluent majority-white communities.

“While it took tragedies like the Parkland [Fla. high school] and Las Vegas shootings to gather us here, I would like to remind everyone that communities of color in Philadelphia, Delaware, Berks, Dauphin, Cambria and Allegheny counties have been victims of gun violence for decades,” McClinton said during her testimony.

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Saying Housing Drives Income Inequality Misses Some Big Points

By

Studies over time have examined connections between income inequality and housing. As Richard Florida, a senior editor at The Atlantic and University Professor and Director of Cities at the University of Toronto’s Martin Prosperity Institute argued, “a mounting body of research suggests that housing inequality may well be the biggest contributor to our economic divides.”

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Community Leaders Aim To Make Chatham A Shopping Destination

January 31, 2018 | CBS Chicago

By Chatham, Local TV, Roseanne Tellez

Chatham, a South Side community often in the headlines for the wrong reasons, is looking to change that perception. Leaders want to put Chatham on the map for shopping. So, business owners and community leaders are launching a “Buy Chatham” initiative to get more people to spend money there.

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New Philadelphia home-repair loan program available to residents in middle neighborhoods

January 18, 2018 | The Philadelphia Inquirer

By Caitlin McCabe

This summer, the city of Philadelphia will launch a $100 million initiative called the “Housing Preservation Loan Program.” Congratulations to Council President Darrell Clarke, as well as Councilwoman Cherelle Parker, the Healthy Rowhouse and other housing advocates in the Philadelphia metro area! A feature of Housing Preservation Loan Program (much unlike a housing program implemented in Baltimore that used private lending loan pool) is that it draws from city resources and will provide low-interest loans at a 3% rate to thousands of its middle neighborhood residents with houses in disrepair. Currently, recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau finds that “more than 160,000 homes in the Philadelphia metro area experienced roof leaks. Nearly 120,000 had a crumbling foundation. At least 70,000 homes had mold.” And lastly, about 258,000 households reported experiencing many hours of “uncomfortable cold.” The Housing Preservation Loan Program will dole out up to $25,000 per applicant and contribute to other home-repair grant programs to alleviate the city’s housing problems.

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The Lifeblood of Cities: “Middle” neighborhoods—neither affluent nor poor—remain crucial to urban success

January 9, 2018 | City Journal

By Aaron M. Renn

The media tend to portray urban neighborhoods as either booming gentrified districts or zones of impoverishment. Neighborhoods in between get overlooked. But these older urban and inner-suburban “middle neighborhoods” may be where the next generation of urban problems—or solutions—will be found. Cities once held vast tracts of such neighborhoods, populated by workers in manufacturing or the civil service. With what analysts call a “barbell” economy dividing increasingly into rich and poor, it’s no surprise that urban middle-class neighborhoods are feeling squeezed.

Revitalizing our ‘middle neighborhoods’: One bold idea

December 3, 2017 | The Philadelphia Inquirer |

Op-Ed by Dwight Evans & Ken Weinstein

Cities compete for people. Philadelphia is no different. According to researchers at The Reinvestment Fund in Philadelphia, approximately 48 percent of city residents, across the country, live in “middle neighborhoods,” which are described as stable, working-class communities that generally lack outside investment, especially when compared with areas such as Center City, Graduate Hospital or Northern Liberties.

Middle neighborhoods are often saddled with blight, but have extraordinary potential for growth, when given the proper tools. They typically are affordable, safe, and functional.

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ON THE EDGE: OUR CITY’S MIDDLE NEIGHBORHOODS

July 25, 2017 | ceosforcities.com | PDF

by Paul C. Brophy 

Researchers at the Reinvestment Fund in Philadelphia report that 48 percent of central city residents in the United States live in “middle neighborhoods.” These neighborhoods are generally affordable and attractive and they offer a reasonable quality of life, but many are in danger of decline.

A shrinking middle class, the suburbanization of jobs, obsolete housing styles, and shrinking homeownership rates clouds the future of these middle neighborhoods that serve as the lynchpin of success for most American city regions.  Yet these areas—that provide a substantial portion of local property-tax revenue–are relatively ignored by policymakers who have focused on the problems of concentrated poverty, gentrification, and the need for downtown revitalization.

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Across The Country, Some Neighborhoods Are Thriving And Some Struggling, But What About The Ones That Fall Somewhere In The Middle?

July 27, 2017 | HuffingtonPost.com | PDF

by Rep. Dwight Evans & Paul C. Brophy

Researchers at Reinvestment Fund in Philadelphia report that 48 percent of city residents in the United States live in “middle neighborhoods.” These neighborhoods are generally affordable and functional, and they offer a reasonable quality of life, but many are in danger of decline.

A shrinking middle class, the suburbanization of jobs, obsolete housing styles, and dwindling homeownership rates cloud the future of these middle neighborhoods that serve as the lynchpin of success for most American cities and older suburbs.

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The Desperate Need For The Vanishing Middle Neighborhood

July 1, 2017 | Forbes.com

by Eric Sherman

Discussions of income inequality frequently focus on the extremes — the poor versus the ultra-wealthy. However, as the reaction of voters in both parties should have reminded everyone last year, many places between the two poles are hurting and need attention.

I spoke recently with Representative Dwight Evans, a Democrat from Pennsylvania’s 2nd congressional district, which includes various sections of Philadelphia, some parts of South Philadelphia and Center City, and some suburbs to the west. The median income is just under $31,000 a year, more than $20,000 below the national median.

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5 ideas from City Council to fix Philly’s middle neighborhoods

June 21, 2017 | billypenn.com | PDF

by Mark Dent

When urban policy experts Paul Brophy and Ira Goldstein and a few colleagues recently came up with the term middle neighborhood to describe areas of cities that are relatively stable but at risk of decline, they envisioned the meeting held Tuesday afternoon by City Council.

Congressman Dwight Evans was talking about federal support and teaming up with city leaders. A stream of community leaders were testifying about problems and opportunities in their neighborhoods. And for over two hours, citizens and government officials were serving ideas back and forth.

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From Temple to Trump: Philly’s middle neighborhoods go to Washington

May 23, 2017 | billypenn.com | PDF

by Mark Dent

In early February, Temple University hosted a small gathering where urban development experts Ira Goldstein and Paul Brophy told politicians about Philadelphia’s middle neighborhoods. These neighborhoods are where about 45 percent of our population lives, mostly-stable areas at risk because they’re not getting privately developed like Center City and not so blighted that they receive government funding.

Months later, middle neighborhoods have gone national, slowly becoming a conversation topic in Washington, D.C. The issue of middle neighborhoods has reached the Office of Housing and Urban Development; Philly Congressman Dwight Evans hosted a Congressional briefing on them last week. The concept has even crossed the desk of President Donald Trump.

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