On the Edge

ABOUT THE EDITOR

Paul C. Brophy is a principal with Brophy & Reilly LLC, a Maryland-based consulting firm specializing in economic development in older industrial cities, mixed-income housing, neighborhood revitalization, and currently serves on the Adjunct Faculty of the Urban & Regional Planning Program at Georgetown University. Mr. Brophy has been involved with the challenges facing older industrial cities since 1970 as a public official, a practitioner, an author, and a professor. A critical basis for his work were his ten years in city government in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (1977-1986) where he was director of housing and then executive director of the Urban Redevelopment Authority. A leader in the Renaissance II initiatives of Mayor Richard S. Caliguiri, Mr. Brophy’s work included downtown revitalization, the reuse of vacant steel mill sites, and the strengthening of the City’s neighborhoods. For his work in Pittsburgh, he was named one of the “savviest municipal issuers” by Institutional Investor magazine, and “The Best of the New Generation” by Esquire.

From 1988-1993, Mr. Brophy was president and then vice chair and co-CEO of the Enterprise Foundation founded by Jim and Patty Rouse. While in these executive positions, Mr. Brophy worked with community groups and local governments around the nation to develop thousands of units of housing for low and moderate-income families, and to improve neighborhoods. In 1994, Mr. Brophy established his consulting firm. His practice centers on the creation and implementation of strategies to improve the economic health of older industrial cities. Through his relationship with the Goldseker Foundation, Mr. Brophy has worked with Johns Hopkins University in developing and implementing the largest redevelopment project in Baltimore in over two decades – a mixed-use development immediately north of Johns Hopkins Medicine. He is currently advising Washington University in St. Louis on a number of strategic initiatives. He worked closely with Mayor Jerry Abramson in Louisville on Park DuValle, one of the most successful mixed-income residential developments in the nation.